Finding the Best Long-Term Care Facility for a Loved One

Finding the Best Long-Term Care Facility for a Loved One

Updated for 2018 Placing a loved one in a long-term care facility is often one of the hardest decisions a family must make. As our population has aged, the number and type of these facilities have increased to accommodate the need. There are active adult communities, assisted living centers, special care units (memory care, palliative care, and others), nursing care facilities, residential care and specialized facilities for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. Also available are progressive care campuses that offer residents a continuum from independent living through full nursing care. The search to find the “best” or “right” facility can be confusing and stressful. The challenges are compounded when a sudden health issue requires a quick decision. Not all long-term care facilities are created equal, and you want your loved one to have the best care possible. Here are some things to consider and some resources available here in North Carolina to help you make your decision: North Carolina adult care facilities are licensed and inspected by the state. There is a star rating system based on the annual inspection results. You may search by county, city or facility name. This is a good place to start but should not be the only factor in your decision. The search page is located at http://www.ncdhhs.gov/dhsr/acls/star/search.asp. Look at Medicaid’s nursing home comparison tool located at http://medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare/search.html. You can choose up to three facilities to compare. Note: Medicare is implementing a new star rating system. You can find a thorough explanation of the new rating system and how to review the facilities in comparison to the current star system. Tour the facility at...
May is National Elder Law Month

May is National Elder Law Month

There is a lot going on in May. In addition to honoring all the mothers out there, we also celebrate Older Americans Month and National Elder Law Month. As we grow older and wiser (we hope!), it is important to remain engaged. Today’s seniors are more active than ever, spending time working, volunteering, traveling, or mentoring younger people. Many also talk to estate planning and elder law attorneys to plan for their future or regarding issues related to the care of their loved ones. What is Elder Law? Elder law encompasses a wide range of legal topics, including healthcare directives, healthcare and financial powers of attorney, long-term care planning, Medicaid planning, guardianships, special needs planning, and similar matters. Elder law attorneys may also help coordinate public or private resources to assist the client and handle estate planning or probate matters. What is the Difference Between Elder Law and Estate Planning? Estate planning is often referred to as “wills and trusts” and involves determining how an individual would like his or her estate distributed upon their death. It also covers advance directives, powers of attorney, special needs trusts, digital asset review, and asset protection planning. There is some overlap between estate planning and elder law, though not all estate planning attorneys necessarily handle every aspect of elder law. When Do I Need an Elder Law Attorney? Many of our clients are adult children whose aging parents require legal assistance related to elder law issues. You may wish to speak to an elder law attorney if you, a spouse, or a parent is expected to need long-term care, is no longer...

Is It Time for a Senior Living Community?

Have you been considering a move to a senior living community? As they reach retirement age, many people begin looking at their living situations and talking about transitioning to an easier lifestyle. They may be tired of maintaining a large house and lawn, find they don’t have as much free time as expected (due to the house and lawn!), are not located where it is easy to socialize, or have concerns about living alone.  So, how do you decide when it’s time to consider a senior living community? Watch the first video in the Decision Time series and hear from others on the topic. Attorneys David Inabinett and Ryan McNeill also provide...
Ready to Move to a Senior Living Community?

Ready to Move to a Senior Living Community?

As our lives change over time, our desires for a certain type of living situation may also change. When you are young, an apartment close to the “action” can seem like the ideal situation. Once you marry and have children, a big single-family home may work best. Once the kids have moved out and you are retired or approaching retirement, that big house may require much more of your time than you are willing to give! Types of Senior Living Communities There are several types of senior living communities, depending on your needs. The most common include: Independent living, often referred to as “55+” or “active adult” communities, may range from traditional homes to villas or apartments. Assisted living communities are aimed at people who need help with the activities of daily living, like bathing, dressing, and taking medications. Long-term care facilities (nursing homes) provide care for individuals who cannot live alone or care for themselves any longer. Memory care units may be standalone facilities or part of other communities. These units take care of individuals with dementia, Alzheimer’s or similar memory issues. There are also hybrid facilities that might include independent living and assisted living, but not nursing care, or continuing care communities, which offer the option of starting in independent living and receiving care in the community through your lifetime. As you investigate communities, it is important to understand what each offers and read the fine print in their agreements. Are You Ready to Move to a Senior Living Community? There is no right answer that applies to everyone. For some, moving to a community where they...
Choosing the Right Senior Living Community

Choosing the Right Senior Living Community

Two of our elder law attorneys, David Inabinett and Ryan McNeill, were recently interviewed for a video on considerations when choosing the right senior living community. Check out the video...
Filing a Long-Term Care Insurance Claim

Filing a Long-Term Care Insurance Claim

By Ryan McNeill, Attorney at Law Many financial planning experts recommend purchasing long-term care insurance. Long-term care policies may cover part of the cost of at home health care, assisted living, nursing home care, or some combination of the above, depending on the plan. At the point in time you need to use the coverage – either for a single incident or a permanent change in your health – you must file a claim to receive your benefits. According to the American Association for Long Term Care Insurance (AALTCI), in 2015 insurance carriers paid $8.16 billion in long-term care claims to more than a quarter of a million plan holders. In many cases, these claims are filed by family members on behalf of the person needing care. It is good practice to have completed a durable power of attorney and have that on file so the insurance company can legally speak with your representatives. You may also wish to send them a copy of your health care power of attorney, just to be certain you cover all contingencies. Following these steps may improve the chances of your claim being paid when initially filed: Carefully review the terms of your insurance coverage to determine exactly what services are covered and in what environments. Older policies may restrict coverage to care received in a nursing home and exclude care at an assisted living facility or at-home care. If you have misplaced your copy of the policy, you may request one from the insurance company. Understand how your insurance policy determines your eligibility for benefits. This is called the “benefit trigger.” Your...