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Impact COVID-19: Families First Corona Virus Response Act, Unemployment, and More

Impact COVID-19: Families First Corona Virus Response Act, Unemployment, and More

There is no doubt things have changed for you and the entire country. Children are being homeschooled. Businesses are temporarily closed or permanently shut down, and unemployment is on the rise. Who knew at the start of 2020 that we all would be under stay-at-home orders? Watch our virtual seminar from Brinkley Walser Stoner attorney Bradley Hunt to learn and understand how to navigate changes to the law. A speacial thank you to the Women’s Resource Center of Greensboro. Brinkley Walser Stoner attorneys are here to help with your legal needs; schedule your appointment today to speak with one of our experienced...
Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst During COVID-19

Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst During COVID-19

By Will Miller Since mid-March of this year, we have all been living in the shadow of COVID-19. Although we all experience death during our lives, the pandemic has heightened awareness of human vulnerability and mortality, both for ourselves and our loved ones. We wonder what would happen if we became critically ill from the virus, how our illness would affect our family and friends, and what we can do to prepare for the possibility of grave illness or death. Illness and death are morbid topics in the best of times, perhaps more so in the midst of a pandemic. However, the value of taking proactive steps to prepare for the worst is rarely more apparent than now. A comprehensive estate plan provides preparation for illness and end of life through advanced directives for incapacity and end-of-life treatment, as well as for instructions for the division of assets among loved ones at death. An initial step toward such preparation is considering what decisions may need to be made regarding your medical care if you become incapacitated and unable to communicate your wishes. If you were unable to breathe due to COVID-19, would you want to be intubated and connected to a ventilator? What if your treating physician determined that you were not going to recover from the virus – would you want to be kept alive as long as possible, or would you want life support to be withheld or withdrawn? Questions concerning end-of-life medical treatment are relevant for many illnesses and conditions, but current events make us more mindful of such scenarios. An estate planning attorney can guide...
March Update 2020

March Update 2020

Do You Have Enough Auto Insurance? Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) cause more than 30,000 deaths each year and are a top ten cause of death among people aged 1-54.  In 2017, a total of 275,067 MVAs occurred on North Carolina roadways, an increase of 9,000 from the previous year.  A total of 81,865 North Carolina MVAs resulted in an injury and 1,297 resulted in a fatality. READ MORE Pandemics & Legal Considerations We are living in an unprecedented time, facing a virus that we cannot see whose impact is being felt across the globe. We are hearing advice from all corners (some good, some bad). Most of us are coping with daily life while trying to work from home, educate our children until online learning options are available or they return to their classrooms and maintain physical distance from friends and loved ones. As we watch the news, it seems like the situation changes hourly. Knowing this is temporary and things will improve helps. READ MORE COVID-19 Update Legal providers have been labeled as an essential business so our office will remain open and operating with our regular hours.  Some of the precautions we are taking include spacing out appointments to have fewer people in the office at one time; a drop box right inside our door for the delivery of documents; and we’re offering the option for virtual or telephone appointments if you would like to schedule one. For various reasons, some of us may be working remotely during this time.  If you call to reach us be sure and leave a message and your call will be...
Pandemics & Legal Considerations

Pandemics & Legal Considerations

We are living in an unprecedented time, facing a virus that we cannot see whose impact is being felt across the globe. We are hearing advice from all corners (some good, some bad). Most of us are coping with daily life while trying to work from home, educate our children until online learning options are available or they return to their classrooms, and maintain physical distance from friends and loved ones. As we watch the news, it seems like the situation changes hourly. Knowing this is temporary and things will improve helps. County, state and federal officials are working to manage and direct responses to the pandemic, and we see true heroes daily as most everyone pitches in to help. We thank the first responders, healthcare workers, truck drivers, delivery teams, and employees of essential businesses like grocery stores and pharmacies. There are other heroes behind the scenes taking small steps to help – from people donating blood to help address the blood shortage, to teachers checking in on their kids, to those checking daily on an elderly neighbor with no local family. There are too many to list here, but know we appreciate all of you. We wanted to share some thoughts around the pandemic and these challenging times: Take care of yourself and your loved ones. The global scale of the pandemic should make us all recognize health or a long life are never guaranteed. If you do not have a will, advance directives, or other estate plans in place, now is an excellent time to take care of this vital task. Much of this work can...
COVID-19 Update

COVID-19 Update

As of March 26, 2020 Legal providers have been labeled as an essential business so our office will remain open and operating with our regular hours.  Some of the precautions we are taking include spacing out appointments to have fewer people in the office at one time; a drop box right inside our door for the delivery of documents; and we’re offering the option for virtual or telephone appointments if you would like to schedule one. For various reasons some of us may be working remotely during this time.  If you call to reach us be sure and leave a message and your call will be returned within 24 hours. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause as we work to comply with the recommendations to prevent the spread of COVID-19.  As of March 16,2020 The health and well-being of our employees and clients is our highest priority. In light of recommendations from NCDHHS and CDC, we are asking that if you are feeling unwell or experiencing symptoms such as fever, cough and/or shortness of breath, please avoid coming into the offices, even to deliver or pick up documents. Of course, please avoid coming into our offices for the safety of others if you are confirmed to have COVID-19 or have a family member at home that is confirmed to have COVID-19. We will be rescheduling matters that are not time sensitive. Our website’s “contact us” page and email will be the most efficient way to reach us if it becomes necessary for our team to work from home. You may also leave a message at our main...
Do You Have Enough Auto Insurance?

Do You Have Enough Auto Insurance?

By Roy L. McDonald, II, Attorney at Law Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) cause more than 30,000 deaths each year and are a top ten cause of death among people aged 1-54.  In 2017, a total of 275,067 MVAs occurred on North Carolina roadways, an increase of 9,000 from the previous year.  A total of 81,865 North Carolina MVAs resulted in an injury and 1,297 resulted in a fatality. The average economic cost of a non-fatal disabling injury in a MVA is $61,600.00.  The average economic cost of a death resulting from a MVA is $1,130,000.  The average cost of a new car is $36,718.00.  A fully loaded 2020 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD Premier Plus retails for more than $75,000.00. Not having enough automobile insurance could cause you to have personal financial responsibility for your own or someone else’s bodily injury or property damage after a MVA, so it is important that you have the right kind and the right amount of automobile insurance coverage. Liability Coverage Liability coverage protects you if you cause a MVA.  It is divided into bodily injury coverage and property damage coverage.  Bodily injury coverage is separated into per person and per accident limits.  You are legally required to carry a minimum of $30,000.00 per person/$60,000.00 per accident in bodily injury coverage.  This means that if you have only the required minimum amount of bodily injury coverage and cause a MVA your policy will pay no more than $30,000.00 to each person injured.  This also means that if more than one person is injured, your policy will pay no more than $60,000.00 among all the people...
What You Need to Know When Buying Your First Home

What You Need to Know When Buying Your First Home

By E. Drew Nelson, Attorney Buying your first home can be an exciting (and sometimes scary) process. As you look at homes or floor plans, you are probably imagining what the house will look like once it becomes yours. Where will you put your furniture? What do you need to buy? What colors will you paint the rooms? Once you are ready to make an offer and become a homeowner, there are some things you should know before you sign on the dotted line. Here is a list of some of the more common things buyers need to know. This list is by no means all encompassing, so if you have questions about the process or the laws governing real estate transactions in North Carolina, you may wish to consult with an attorney: For most people, purchasing a first home will be the largest dollar transaction they have ever made. Your best bet is to get pre-approved by a reputable mortgage company before you begin house-hunting. It’s important to understand all the terms of the mortgage loan document before you sign. You are borrowing money from the bank and the property is being used to secure the loan. Should you default, you may lose your home and your credit will be damaged. When you make an offer on a home, you generally will provide earnest money to show your intent to purchase the home. These monies are typically held in escrow by the realtor and applied toward the purchase price at closing. Should you back out of the agreement, you will lose the earnest money. Many homes are part...
February Update 2020

February Update 2020

Businesses Without Workers’ Compensation Insurance Beware! Generally speaking, in North Carolina an employer must provide workers’ compensation insurance coverage for its employees if it regularly employs three or more people. This coverage kicks in if the employee is injured on the job. Some small business owners do not realize they must provide the required coverage for their employees. Others make a conscious decision to avoid the related expense hoping they are not caught. READ MORE Nelson Participates in “Speed Coaching” for LAUNCH Thomasville Brinkley Walser Stoner, PLLC, attorney E. Drew Nelson will meet with LAUNCH Thomasville participants for a “speed coaching” session on February 11, 2020. The coaching session will allow LAUNCH members to ask questions of area business professionals as they begin their eight-week training programs. READ MORE Direct Impact: The Americans with Disabilities Act Most people do not give much daily thought to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). I know I didn’t before I lost my eyesight. However, as I adjusted to life with blindness, I learned quite a bit about the intent and implementation of the ADA. The law was enacted in 1990 and has had many amendments throughout the years. The ADA is intended to prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities across a wide spectrum. Some of the obvious things we see on a daily basis include buildings with ramps and automated door openers, accessible parking spaces, hotels with walk-in showers and safety railings, and braille lettering on elevator keypads. Less obvious are requirements related to communication and employment. READ MORE Events Join Brinkley Walser Stoner attorney Bradley Hunt for this virtual seminar to learn how...
Three Questions to Ask Before You Start a New Business

Three Questions to Ask Before You Start a New Business

Bradley Hunt| Everyone wants to be an entrepreneur. The idea of running your own business, not punching the clock, and not having to answer to a superior is what most people dream of. However, it is not as easy as it seems. To operate a successful business or company there are guidelines, procedures, and laws that you need to adhere to. Name selection, business structure, and licensing are important elements in starting any new business. What Name Should I Choose? A name is more than just a name when starting a new business. The name of your new business is the first thing customers will notice. We recommend coming up with several names in case your first (or second) choice is not available. New business owners don’t always consider that there are state and federal requirements to meet or that someone else may have already registered the name you wanted. The North Carolina Secretary of State website offers guidelines for choosing a business name: “An entity name shall not contain language stating or implying that the entity is organized for any purpose other than a purpose that is lawful and that is permitted by its formation documents. (i.e., Articles of Incorporation)The name must be distinguishable upon the records of the Secretary of State from the name of any other entity on the business registry. By Administrative Code, the business entity suffix of the name (i.e., Inc., LLC) is not used to determine distinguishability on the records.An entity name shall not contain words offensive to accepted standards of decency.” From a practical perspective, you may not want to choose a...
Direct Impact: The Americans with Disabilities Act

Direct Impact: The Americans with Disabilities Act

By Will Miller, Attorney at Law Most people do not give much daily thought to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). I know I didn’t before I lost my eyesight. However, as I adjusted to life with blindness, I learned quite a bit about the intent and implementation of the ADA. The law was enacted in 1990 and has had many amendments throughout the years. The ADA is intended to prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities across a wide spectrum. Some of the obvious things we see on a daily basis include buildings with ramps and automated door openers, accessible parking spaces, hotels with walk-in showers and safety railings, and braille lettering on elevator keypads. Less obvious are requirements related to communication and employment. What Does the ADA Cover? The Americans with Disabilities Act has five primary sections, or Titles, that address different aspects: Title I: Employment Title I has the largest impact on most businesses. This section of the law prohibits discrimination during the application and hiring process, training, and firing; it also requires businesses to provide “reasonable accommodations” for job applicants and current employees with a disability. (More on what employers need to know below.) Title II: Public Services Local, state and federal government agencies must ensure programs, services and activities they provide are accessible to individuals with a disability. (This section does not apply to business owners.) Title III: Public Accommodations This Title applies to all business owners and non-profits, regardless of the number of employees. It may also impact your Homeowner’s Association if you have a clubhouse, pool, or other facilities used by the public....